Charlie D Profile: Social networking done right

By Tracey Gregory, Project Manager
09/15/2011

Last December, Skaneateles Jewelry indicated that they were interested in developing their diamond engagement ring marketing plan, specifically targeting 20-30 somethings in the marketplace. Thus began the Skaneateles Jewelry social networking campaign.

Our first move was to create the “Charlie D” personality. Chip Davis’s eldest son, Charles Davis was a natural and his approachability and youth made him a prime candidate for spokesperson of the social media side of the business. A photo shoot or two later, we set up several different social networking accounts and began developing content to attract potential customers.

Fast forward six months, and “Charlie D” has been “friended” by more than eight hundred fans on Facebook, is an active participator in the Twitter community, and even has his own blog devoted to everything engagement. The social networking campaign we launched for Skaneateles Jewelry was executed in tandem with traditional media campaigns, with radio, print and billboards driving traffic to the specific sites.

Social networking may not be for everyone, but when done right, the results speak for themselves; over the past few months, the Skaneateles Jewelry presence has steadily grown online. If you are considering creating a campaign for a client, or perhaps using social media to promote your business, there are three things you should keep in mind to ensure a successful campaign:

1) You must build a personality.

Whether creating a character or just writing from your own perspective, you must be personable. If your target audience can’t relate to you, then you’ve lost them already.

2) You must have timely, relevant content.

Most people will look (read: glance) at your content and ask themselves, “why should I care?” If you can offer something useful and pertinent, chances are they’ll keep reading.

3) That content must generate measurable results.

If you can’t measure your results either via changes in revenue or tracking your social media site traffic with apps like Google analytics or built in traffic monitors such as the one Facebook comes equipped with, then it will be difficult to determine whether or not you’re really making progress. If you can actually see the difference between where you were when you started and where you are now, you’ll know where to go (and where to devote the majority of your resources) in the future.

Remember, social media isn’t for everyone. Plan on spending at least an hour a day interacting with other users and creating content for your site. If you’re able to make the time commitment and stick with it, the opportunities are limitless!

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